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rawspicebar15

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Member Since: Jan 15, 2015


Last Posted Recipe: Jul 24, 2017

Hickory Smoked Bloody Mary Margarita

1. Rub the top rim of the glass with the lemon wedge, then upturn and roll the rim in RawSpiceBar’s Hickory Smoked Salt. 2. Combine all of the ingredients except the cucumber spear and olive in a cocktail shaker with ice. 3. Shake to combine, and then strain over fresh ice into the salted highball glass. Garnish with the cucumber and olive.

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Kansas City Style Pork Ribs

1. Combine brown sugar, salt and RawSpiceBar’s Kansas BBQ Rub. 2. Massage spice rub and sugar mixture into ribs and let them sit in the fridge for at least 1 hour or preferably overnight. 3. To cook them on the grill, turn grill to 225F and place ribs meat-side down on indirect heat. Turn the ribs every half hour, basting with BBQ sauce every 20 minutes. Cook until the ribs are tender, about 3 to 4 hours. 4. If cooking them indoors, turn the oven to 350F. Place the ribs in a roasting pan with a rack. Slather the ribs with BBQ sauce and tent a piece of aluminum foil over them. Place ribs in the preheated oven, basting them with sauce every 30 minutes. Remove the foil for the last 30 minutes. It will take 2.5 to 3 hours for them to become fully cooked and tender.

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Hickory Smoked Potato Salad

1. Wash and scrub the potatoes and cut them into halves or quarters. 2. Bring a pot of water to boil, add the potatoes and cook them until fork-tender, about 20-30 minutes. Drain the water and let the potatoes cool. 3. Once they are cool, cut them into bite-sized cubes and place them in a large bowl. 4. In a separate bowl, whisk together RawSpiceBar’s Hickory Smoked Sea Salt, vinegar, vegetable broth, mustard and salt and pepper. 5. Pour this mixture over the potatoes and mix well with a spatula. Stir in the sliced green onions. Taste and add more vinegar, salt, pepper, or smoked salt if needed. Serve warm or at room temperature and enjoy!

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Watermelon - Charnushka Sesame Salad

1. Combine watermelon and goat cheese. Toss gently with orange zest and RawSpiceBar’s Charnushka Sesame. 2. In a small bowl, whisk orange and lemon juices together with the olive oil. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Drizzle this dressing over the watermelon and goat cheese. Serve immediately and enjoy.

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Mini Kaffir Lime Tarts

Mini Kaffir Lime Tarts

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Cambodian Fish Amok

Cambodian Fish Amok, Steamed rice, to serve

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Afghan Marinated Lamb (for Kabuli Pulao)

1. Wash and pat the meat dry. Season generously with salt and pepper. 2. Over medium temperature heat 2 tablespoons of vegetable oil and add the onion. Stir until just wilted. 3. Add the garlic and the saffron and stir to combine flavors. 4. Then add the meat, the rest of the vegetable oil, and keep stirring until the pieces are browned on all sides. 5. Add water, reduce heat to low, and cook, skimming the surface as needed. Cook for 1.5 hours, or until the lamb is fork tender. 6. Remove the lamb and set aside in a bowl. 7. Reserve the stock.

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Ginger Saffron Tea

1. Peel ginger and chop it coarsely 2. Pour the 4 cups of water into a pot, add the ginger and cinnamon (optional) and bring to a boil. 3. Turn the heat to low. Add the RawSpiceBar’s Saffron strands, cover and simmer for 15 minutes. 4. Uncover, turn heat slightly up and simmer for an additional 5 minutes. Add honey if you like it sweet. 5. Strain tea into 4 cups. Serve and enjoy!

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Afghan Kabuli Pulao

1. Earlier in the day: Place the rice in a large colander and run cold water over it to rinse it well. 2. Now pour the rice in a large bowl and cover it with cold water to soak for 4 to 5 hours. 3. Pour 1/6 cup of sugar into a large, hot saucepan over medium heat and keep shaking the pan until the sugar caramelizes. 4. Add 1 cup of the reserved lamb stock, the RawSpiceBar’s Afghan Pulao Spices, salt and pepper to taste, if needed. Bring to a boil, remove from heat and set aside. 5. Drain the soaked rice. Then, following the cooking directions on the package, boil it until just soft. Drain again and pour the rice over the caramelized sugar mixture and stir until the rice is well coated. 6. Using a frying pan, heat 1 tablespoon of oil over medium-high heat. Add the carrots and the remaining sugar and stir for 5 minutes or until caramelized and glossy. Add the raisins and cook for another minute. Remove from heat and set aside. 7. With the underside of a large wooden spoon punch holes all over the rice allowing the steam to escape. Drizzle rice with olive oil. 8. Now, top the rice with the carrot mixture and the prepared lamb. 9. Cover with a tea towel and the lid of the pan. Make sure the towel is under the lid so it doesn’t burn. Now turn the heat to high and cook the rice mixture for 5 minutes. Reduce the heat to low and cook for another 10 minutes. Remove from heat and keep it covered for 10 more minutes. 10. To serve, cover a large platter with a layer of the rice, spoon the lamb over it, and then all the remaining rice. Top with the carrot mixture and finally with the almonds and pistachios. This serves a large family, as is traditional with Afghan communities.

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Berbere Spiced Chickpeas - Sweet Potato

Berbere Spiced Chickpeas & Sweet Potato

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Lentil Soup With Egyptian Spices

Lentil Soup With Egyptian Spices

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Pumpkin Spice Dabo Kolo (Ethiopian Pumpkin

Pumpkin Spice Dabo Kolo (Ethiopian Pumpkin Spice Ricotta Donuts)

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Key Wat (Spicy Ethiopian Stewed Beef)

Key Wat (Spicy Ethiopian Stewed Beef)

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Berbere Roasted Carrots, Fennel - Mint

Berbere Roasted Carrots, Fennel & Mint

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Misr Wot (Ethiopian Spicy Lentil Stew)

Misr Wot (Ethiopian Spicy Lentil Stew)

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Butternut - Delicata Squash Soup

" I grew up eating soup every night for dinner. Soups are a big thing in France, it's served as a first course during winter followed by the main dish. I loved my mom's pumpkin soup so I asked her to send me her recipe and just like every time I ask her recipes she just tells me to throw stuff in the water, taste it and correct it. Thanks mom. The french don't use as much cinnamon and nutmeg or pumpkin spice, I have no idea why but it's not in any food tradition. Maybe in the eastern part of the country around Christmas they use it more but not even sure…When I moved here I realized how big was cinnamon and later re-discovered nutmeg. This combo is my favorite to use between Thanksgiving and Christmas and I can not get tired of it! It's perfect for baking, for drinks, soups and more.

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New Mexican Posole Rojo - Freshly

The star of this month's spice box, this classic New Mexican posole is a light brothed, deeply flavorful and moderately spicy stew perfect for January. Made with hominy, large kernels of puffed white corn (posole just means "dried corn" and hominy means "cooked posole"), for body and traditionally made with pork shoulder for flavor. Our ground chile powder blend of New Mexican chili peppers, ancho and guajillo chiles and arbol chiles provide fruity, peppery depth with a bit of heat. The beauty of this dish is the ability to swap in vegetables, chicken or beef for pork and garbanzo beans for the hominy (if you can't find it locally) to suit your tastes. Top with winter root vegetables, like peppery radishes, chopped cilantro and lime to brighten this fun, warming dish just before serving.

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Poached Apples With Juniper Berries - Spic

We've incorporated juniper berries used hundreds of years ago by Native Americans, plus cloves, allspice, cinnamon and orange zest for a spiced glaze that will permeate through these poached apples. Valued by Native Americans, juniper berries were used medicinally for arthritis and rheumatism and for detoxification as a diuretic, with antiseptic properties. While we’re not sure about the medicinal properties, we do know that poaching these apples with juniper berries and these spices makes the room smell incredible.

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Brown Rice Pancakes With Juniper Berries

Dreamed up by one of our awesomely creative customers & chefs at The Azarian, we had to share these with you (you can find the original recipe on his site). These pancakes are super easy to whip up and are loved by our paleo and non-paleo friends alike. We recommend making these as mini pancakes as they are easier to flip over. Drizzle with our juniper berries & winter spice syrup for a perfect chilly morning breakfast. We can't think of a better combination.

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Garam Masala Spice Deviled Eggs

When I get my RawSpiceBar spice blends each month I use them to hold up my end of the “mandatory roommate family style dinner” contract. This is a fun time to catch up but also the only time we eat real food with most other meals alternating between healthy but boring steamed chicken and broccoli or fried bits in a takeaway box. I always try and make the “family” meals enjoyable for myself and my flat mates. This month I got Punjabi Garam Masala and Rose & Chai blends and I immediately thought “yay let’s make chicken tikka masala!” But some of my less adventurous roommates thought “that’s going to be way too spicy for me!” Picky eaters are hard to please, mostly because short of playing the toddler game where you zoom the food into their mouths like an airplane, it’s hard to get people to try new things. Luckily, dinner attendance is mandatory. The RawSpiceBar Punjabi Garam Masala has a rich spice flavor but is not overly spicy, you can always add hot red pepper if you like fire or more cinnamon if your family has a sweet tooth. Garam Masala is typically more sweet than spicy. To combat my flatmates pickiness I made an appetizer that they had all had in some variation before – garam masala deviled eggs.

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Garam Masala Braised Short Ribs

Receive 3-4 hand-picked, small batch, freshly ground spice blends with each monthly box. Each monthly spice box contains 1-3 ounces of spice blends, creating three dishes for serving 8-10. You will also receive kitchen-tested, detailed recipes and ideas for each spice blend you receive as well as a background on our monthly chef and spice blends every month. Our spice experts, many of whom are award winning chefs, bring you unique spice blends from the highest quality spices around the world, with an unprecedented focus on quality and flavor. Each spice of the month club subscription is a one time purchase and can be purchased in increments of 3, 6 or 12 months. **Please note all orders placed after the first of each month will receive the following month's spice box, which will ship the first week of the month. If you are ordering our subscription spice box as a gift, you will receive a personalized gift certificate within 24 hours of your order to print or email for your recipient. If you need it sooner, just let us know and we will accommodate you. Get ready to start your spice journey with the freshest spices from around the world!

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Garam Masala Power Salad Bowl

The best part of this Indian inspired salad, besides how healthy and colorful it is, is the crunchy roasted garam masala chickpeas and walnuts on top. The salad dressing- mixed with fresh lemon juice, yogurt, olive oil and garlic is creamy and has the perfect amount of tang to balance out the spicy salad ingredients.

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Learn How to Make Tachin From The Unmanly

Tahchin is one of the most iconic dishes in Persian cuisine. It’s also perfect for Nowruz, it’s elegant yet satisfying. Moreover it doesn’t have any outlandish flavors so the annoying people at your house who have finicky palettes cannot really get upset about this dish. So what is Tahchin? Basically it’s a rice cake, it’s rice, yogurt, eggs, saffron, and chicken. I like to bake mine in muffin tins, because it allows for a more elegant look. But typically you’ll bake it in a pyrex dish. Get the full recipe here.

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Mango Corn Salsa With Paprika - Ginger

Mango corn salsa with sweet paprika flakes, ginger and allspice create a blend of sweet and spicy that pairs perfectly with citrusy mango and grilled summer corn.

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Jamaican Chili Banana Fritters

This simple Jamaican desert is spiked with cinnamon and nutmeg and counter balanced with a kick from cayenne peppers. Toasted black and white sesame seeds add an extra layer of nuttiness to this easy dish. We love pan frying them for a healthier version to the traditional fried fritters and love eating these as for a breakfast or snack as well.

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Pink Peppercorn Voladores

Peruvian voladores have been a popular desert in Peru for hundreds of years and almost always makes an appearance for a special occasion like Mother's Day. The Spanish word volador means "flying" in English, apparently Voladores are made of crispy thin layers of pastry and typically filled with dulce de leche, chocolate or a fruit jam. We've created a chocolate sauce and topped it with a dusting of pink peppercorns and pink Himalayan sea salt for a unique twist on the traditional desert.

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April's Japanese Spice Box

This month's menu celebrates the clean, simple dishes of Japanese cooking and the spices that help to highlight the use of fresh, seasonal and high quality ingredients that Japanese chefs are so well known for. Cooking methods are delicate and flavorings subtle, which means Japanese chefs rely on a handful of important ingredients for savory depth, or umani. We've included all the core elements in our spice blends: wakame seaweed, black and white toasted sesame seeds and brightly colored matcha, just to name a few. P.S.: Did you know Japan had a 1,200 year ban on eating meat? Only in the late 1800's was the ban lifted. Learn more from our shichimi togarashi tenderloin recipe.

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Matcha & Chia Mochi

Mochi is made from mochi-mai, a type of rice known as “glutinous” or “sweet” in English. This short-grain rice is much stickier than the medium-grain uruchi-mai rice that’s standard in Japanese cuisine. Mochi is made from glutinous rice by pounding steamed rice into dough, creating a more dense version of steamed rice. The earliest evidence of mochi was in early 8th century literature. At that time, Mochi was a special food eaten only by Nobleman or the emperor at religious or celebratory occasions. They added soybean, adzuki bean, sesame seeds or chestnut to glutinous rice. After the 17th century, growing rice had become far more prevalent, making Mochi more accessible and increasingly popular.

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Gomasio & Avocado Soba Noodles

Soba noodles, made of buckwheat flour, is thought to have originated in China and been brought to Japan around 2,500 years ago. Buckwheat is a highly nutritious grain, especially rich in vitamin B. The flour is produced including the skin of the grain, so that the flour takes on a unique flavor and turns a grayish color. This kind of flour is usually used to make the soba that is so popular in Japanese cuisine. Throughout Japanese culture, soba has been regarded as a frugal but special meal. Historically, people ate Soba noodles at the end of each month, called Misoka-soba, since Misoka means ‘the last day of a month’. Misoka-soba was eaten to celebrate another month of working hard and having good health. Soba noodles are traditionally served either chilled with a variety of toppings, or in hot broth as a noodle soup. Many people think that the best way to experience the unique texture of hand-made soba noodles is to eat them cold, since letting them soak in hot broth changes their consistency. We serve our chilled, tossed with a viniagrette and topped with crunchy, spicy and slightly salty gomasio- perfect for a light, spring dish.

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Shichimi Togarashi Grilled Pork Tenderloin

Seven spice powder, or what is commonly known as shichimi togarashi in Japan, pairs perfectly with grilled meats, noodles and soups. Freshly ground orange peel provides a citrusy aroma, while seaweed adds an oceanic flavor. Freshly ground ginger, black peppercorns, and toasted black & white sesame seeds add layers of flavor to make a complex marinade in this grilled pork tenderloin dish. Pork is by far the most popular type of meat in Japan- consumed nearly as much as chicken and beef combined. But it wasn't always this way. The ban on meat began in the mid sixteenth century and is thought to be due to the rise of Buddhism at the time. This ban lasted over 1,200 years and was lifted in the late 1800's, with the rise of foreign trade among countries.

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Braised Lamb Shanks With Rosewater & Advie

A balanced blend of Persian spices & rosewater are slow simmered with lamb shanks, for a succulent flavor you're unlikely to find among other cuts of lamb. Subtle hints of orange zest, lime, dried rose buds and rosewater give this dish subtle complexity- a trademark of Persian cooking. Perfect served alongside long-grain basmati rice tinged with saffron, this dish makes a frequent appearance during Nowruz, Persian New Year, celebrating spring fertility and renewal.

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Mast-o-Khiar With Rose, Herbs & Spices

Earthy, dried green spearmint & dill weed, rose petals and toasted cumin make this savory yogurt dish a perfect, cooling accompaniment to a hot khoresh dish. Dried herbs, which are so often shunned in favor of fresh herbs in Western cooking, are a staple of Persian cooking for their earthy flavor. This dish is even more special when studded with dried fruits like cranberries or raisins and toasted walnuts and topped with a drizzle of good olive oil.

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Baghali Polow With Saffron & Dill

Baghali polow, a rice dish packed with fresh green dill and fava beans is a dish that often makes an appearance during Nowruz. Fresh, green herbs are a mark of spring the world over and this is no exception among any Nowruz celebration. Tahdig, a saffron spiked brown crust, that is created to the bottom of the rice, makes this dish extra special. This month, we've included a pinch of the most expensive spice in the world- saffron threads- in this month's spice box. A little bit goes a long way here- a few threads of this exquisitely flavored, delicate rice, is just enough to flavor this special rice dish.

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Braised Lamb Shanks With Rosewater & Advie

A balanced blend of Persian spices & rosewater are slow simmered with lamb shanks, for a succulent flavor you're unlikely to find among other cuts of lamb. Subtle hints of orange zest, lime, dried rose buds and rosewater give this dish subtle complexity- a trademark of Persian cooking. Perfect served alongside long-grain basmati rice tinged with saffron, this dish makes a frequent appearance during Nowruz, Persian New Year, celebrating spring fertility and renewal.

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Garam Masala Honey Roasted Walnuts

These garam masala honey roasted walnuts are sweet, spicy and inspired with our freshly ground Indian spices- a little too good. Make a big batch and pop them on salads throughout the week for a health packed lunch- or just eat them straight out of the bowl for a feel good mid-afternoon pick me up.

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